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OSHA Standards Why Do They Take So Long?, Jim Maddux

OSHA staff members are often asked, “Why do standards take so long?” In fact, as the saying goes, if I had a few dollars for each time I have been asked this question, I would be rich. OSHA is a complex agency involved in various types of work. OSHA staff inspect workplaces; set enforcement policy; issue guidance; maintain current web pages; develop and deliver training; administer voluntary programs such as partnerships, alliances and the Voluntary Protection Programs; conduct oversight of state OSHA programs, consultation agencies and education centers; and manage and administer in the federal government bureaucracy. The main reason that OSHA standards take so long is because the regulatory process is designed to be slow and deliberate.

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Safety 2015 Proceedings, ASSE

ASSE Safety 2015 Proceedings.

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Safety 2014 Proceedings, ASSE

ASSE Safety 2014 Proceedings.

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S72 AGRI-Seguridad "La Nueva Frontera, Tony Canizales and David Zarate

Nuestro seminario está diseñado a partir de una visión general de alto nivel sobre las muchas variables que existen en esta industria y para dar una idea general hacia lo que las mejores prácticas, recursos y datos de la investigación se pueden utilizar para ayudar en la prevención de lesiones y el cumplimiento de OSHA .

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S72 AGRISafety "The New Frontier, Tony Canizales and David Zarate

Our paper is designed from a high-level overview on the many variables that exist in the agricultural industry and to provide some general insight towards what best practices, resources, and research data can be used to assist in injury prevention and OSHA compliance.

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739 Occupational Dog Bite Prevention: Training Employees to ProtectThemselves from Dog Attacks!, Mitzi Robinson

Dog bite attacks occur each year in the U.S., which require medical treatment. Field employees account for many of these dog bite victims. Each year, thousands are seriously injured by dog bites. Medical bills for treatment of these dog bites are astronomical. Regrettably, the emotional damage to the victims is even higher. When a dog bites once, odds are, the dog will bite again. Knowing what to expect and how to ward off an attack are key factors in minimizing the injuries and potentially saving a life.

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751 Rural Road Safety: How to Reduce Accidents for Rural Road Users, Brian S. Hammer

Some estimates are that rural roads have a 3 times higher accident rate than all other roads. Recently Map-21 eliminated the High Risk Rural Road program in an effort to streamline funding and may eliminate Federal dollars being targeted to the rural road system. The problem will only be getting worse. The changing demographics that characterizes the urban/rural interface has not been well researched and not the result is it is not well planned. A collective approach will be needed to reduce accidents on rural roads and that educating drivers who drive on them, farmers to non-residence, will be the key to further reductions.

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761 Finding Answers Using the ASSE Body of Knowledge, Ann E. Schubert

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) offers assistance to both safety professionals and employers of safety professionals through its on-line resource the Body of Knowledge. This powerful tool helps users identify best practices to better protect people, property, and the environment. For professionals in the field seeking resources and guidance, the Body of Knowledge includes checklists, technical papers, presentation information, training material, and program outlines in a variety of formats including web links, Word documents, PDFs, PowerPoint slides, and videos.

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611 OSHA's General Duty Clause: A Guide to Enforcement and Legal Defenses, Adele L. Abrams

The General Duty Clause (GDC), Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, was intended to serve as a “gap filler” to address recognized hazards that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has not yet regulated. To establish a violation of the GDC, the Secretary of Labor must prove: (1) that the employer failed to render its workplace free of a hazard which was (2) “recognized” and (3) causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm and (4) that feasible means exist to free the workplace of the hazard.

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Green Tobacco Sickness, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

Green tobacco sickness is caused by nicotine exposure from handling tobacco leaves and may cause nicotine poisoning, also called Green Tobacco Sickness (GTS), with symptoms including nausea and vomiting.

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