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Ergonomics Return on Investment, Winnie Ip, Jennie Gober and Walt Rostykus

Ergonomic programs often lack resources: people, time and money. Part of the problem is demonstrating the financial return of ergonomic improvements and ergonomic programs. •OSH professionals can measure the value of improved workplace ergonomics in more ways than the traditional reduction of injury costs. Improved productivity, quality and employee retention can provide greater returns. •This article shares various models of cost justification and the elements of determining the return on investment, and provides guidance on the investment and results data needed to calculate the return.

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Five Steps to Getting Buy-In for Your Ergonomics Process, James Mallon

Human-centered workplace design is not complex. We just need to know the limits of human strength and movement, understand the perceptual preferences humans have, and apply this knowledge to the design of machines, material flow, and methods. This cohesion will create work environments that match human capability and ultimately enhance their performance.

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Safety 2015 Proceedings, ASSE

ASSE Safety 2015 Proceedings.

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Safety 2014 Proceedings, ASSE

ASSE Safety 2014 Proceedings.

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761 Finding Answers Using the ASSE Body of Knowledge, Ann E. Schubert

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) offers assistance to both safety professionals and employers of safety professionals through its on-line resource the Body of Knowledge. This powerful tool helps users identify best practices to better protect people, property, and the environment. For professionals in the field seeking resources and guidance, the Body of Knowledge includes checklists, technical papers, presentation information, training material, and program outlines in a variety of formats including web links, Word documents, PDFs, PowerPoint slides, and videos.

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611 OSHA's General Duty Clause: A Guide to Enforcement and Legal Defenses, Adele L. Abrams

The General Duty Clause (GDC), Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, was intended to serve as a “gap filler” to address recognized hazards that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has not yet regulated. To establish a violation of the GDC, the Secretary of Labor must prove: (1) that the employer failed to render its workplace free of a hazard which was (2) “recognized” and (3) causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm and (4) that feasible means exist to free the workplace of the hazard.

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Musculoskeletal Disorders in Construction, Sang D. Choi, Lu Yuan and James G. Borchardt

This review study addresses work-related musculoskeletal injuries and disorders and practical solutions in seven construction trades/occupations (carpenters, masons, electricians, sheet metal workers, roofers, ironworkers, plumbers). •By identifying risk factors for these injuries and disorders, OSH professionals can offer effective interventions to meet the challenges that contractors face in the field. •The simple good practices solutions summarized can help mitigate potential ergonomic hazards and increase productivity at construction job sites.

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Ergonomic Assessment Toolkit, AIHA Ergonomics Committee

This toolkit is a collection of freely available ergonomic assessment tools with descriptions and, in some cases, training on how to use the tool. The Toolkit also includes a flowchart to help those with less ergonomic evaluation experience identify the correct tool to use for the application the wish to analyze.

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Reducing Musculoskeletal Disorders among Airport Baggage Screeners and Handlers, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

Baggage screeners and handlers at airports are exposed to manual baggage lifting and handling that are associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) evaluated two mechanical lift aids to determine if they could reduce the risk of WMSDs. The two mechanical lift aids reduced some physical WMSD risk factors such as hand loading and spinal compression force.

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SH&E Industry 2015 Salary Survey, Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP)

The purpose of this research project was to better understand compensation trends among Safety, Health, and Environmental (SH&E) professionals. Since 2008, the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP) has measured and reported salary and employment trend data as a service to its certificants and SH&E professionals. In 2015, BCSP hoped to develop a more complete SH&E employment trend and salary picture by inviting five partners to participate in the data collection process. Partners: ASSE - American Society of Safety Engineers; ABIH - American Board of Industrial Hygiene; AHMP - Alliance of Hazardous Materials Professionals; AIHA - American Industrial Hygiene Association; and IHMM - Institute of Hazardous Materials Management.

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What is the BOK?

The Body of Knowledge project is dedicated to creating a living reference that represents the collective knowledge of the Safety, Health and Environmental profession. While the preliminary work has begun, there is still more to do. The purpose of this website is to introduce subject areas that will eventually be part of the Body of Knowledge, and to gather feedback on the future direction, and ongoing assessment of what needs to be completed.

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